90 Years Ago - 1932

No person or firm or corporation shall maintain a piggery in the Town without first applying for permission and receiving the unanimous consent in writing of the Board of Selectman.  Such permit if granted shall be subject to rules and regulations of the Board of Health.

 90 Years Ago – 1932

Rarely has the Manchester stage seen so fine a performance as that put on last Friday evening in Town Hall by the pupils of the G.A. Priest school in their presentation of the operetta “The Blue Belt,” a rustic tale of fairy life in Norway, before an audience that filled every seat.

90 Years Ago – 1932

With this number the Cricket enters upon its 45th volume.  Forty-four years is a long time to stick at one task, but the years have flown swiftly and the task for the most part has been a pleasant one.

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90 Years Ago – 1932

By a 13 – 3 victory over Story High, last Saturday, Rockport climbed to undisputed possession of the lead of the Second Division of the Northeastern Massachusetts Conference baseball league.  The leaders have won four straight.

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90 Years Ago – 1932

This morning another grocery store throws open its doors to the public and invites the patronage of the people.  It is to be known as the Manchester Cash Grocery and is opening at 10 Brook Street, being the store originally opened by Ernest Valentine as a meat and provision market.  The proprietor is Peter G. Kassanos a brother of Nicholas G. Kassanos, who recently retired from the management of Olympia Lunch.

90 Years Ago – 1932

A large number were present Saturday evening at Horticultural Hall for the Annual reunion of the Arbella Club an unusually interesting program being provided, the club being fortunate in securing Mrs. Marie Peary Stafford, daughter of the late Admiral Peary and familiarly called “Snow Baby” as the speaker of the evening, who took her audience on a trip within the artic circle revealing to them some of the wonders of the frozen North.

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90 Years Ago – 1932

Visitors at the Boy Scout headquarters on School Street this week will be surprised and delighted at the fine exhibition that is being shown there of poster work, bird houses and shelters that has been executed entirely by the pupils of the public schools in Grades 3 to 8 inclusive in which some original ideas have been very cleverly worked out.

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 90 Years Ago – 1932

The largest attendance of the year was present at the High School Auditorium Monday evening for the monthly meeting of the association and to listen to a program of dramatics, music, science, art and sports designed by Principal Geer to illustrate in a concise way the various activities of the school as carried on in its everyday curriculum.

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90 Years Ago – 1932

A rather peculiar accident was noted opposite the Post Office Saturday afternoon when a car coming out of the yard of Standley’s Garage crashed the fence at the lower end of the Cheever lot tearing down about 12 feet of fence, fortunately no personal injury being done.

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90 Years Ago - 1932

The regular meeting of the Manchester Historical Society was held Wednesday evening at the home of Major and Mrs. R. C. Allen on Vine Street and was well attended.  Mrs. Allen received her guests very graciously, dressed in Colonial costume of the Marsh Washington period.

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90 Years Ago – 1932

Bear in mind the adjourned Town meeting will be held next Monday at 7:30 p.m. and should be well attended as matters of considerable importance will come up for action among them that of reorganizing the fire department.

The fire department was called out Sunday for a grass fire on the Essex County Club grounds and Monday there were two more alarms.  There was no damage at either of the fires.

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90 Years Ago – 1932

The fire department was called to handle a bad chimney fire at the Stone Mill on Elm Street Monday evening.  It was quite a stubborn blaze and required considerable effort on the part of the department to subdue it which was finally accomplished with not damage.

75 Years Ago – 1947

Mrs. Helen Cool, Manchester’s Visiting Nurse, is in the great need of pieces of sheeting, linen or any soft white cloth.

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90 Years Ago – 1932

The thermometer took a nosedive the first of the week and touched 11 above zero Tuesday morning and Wednesday morning it had warmed up but three degrees.  It has been the coldest mid- March week that has been experienced for several years, not only has the temperature ranged unusually low but for several days a high wind prevailed that chilled one to the marrow, the one redeeming feature being that no snow has accompanied the cold wave.

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115 Years Ago – 1917

The Lookout man in the Gloucester Daily Times has an article taken from the Boston Transcript regarding the old pulpits, 4 of which have been used in the Congregational church which was built in 1792 all of which are in existence today.

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90 Years Ago – 1932

One of the strangest and most complicated cases the local police have had to deal with for quite some time was that which came to their notice at 12:20 Friday morning when the telephone rang at the police station with an announcement from Chester Ward, Jr. of Magnolia saying that someone had stolen a car belonging to his mother, from her garage and made off with it in the direction of Manchester, also stating that the man taking it had the appearance of being under the influence of liquor.

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115 Years Ago – 1917

Following the thaw and rain on Friday of last week the streets were in a very dangerous condition, keeping on the feet being almost impossible.  Sunday was fair and colder, Monday brought warmer weather, rain beginning early in the day continuing until late at night, leaving bare ground Tuesday with temperatures of 46 above in early morning.

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90 Years Ago – 1932

Masters Donald Chapman and Robert Hooper, each about 8 years of age, had a rather unpleasant experience Wednesday afternoon while playing on the ice on Central Pond.  The ice had become quite rotten from the warm weather and before they knew what was happening, they broke through and sank to their chins in the water, but were able to keep their heads above water by holding on to the edges of the ice.  Fortunately, their predicament was observed by Gordon Burgess at the engine house and being near the shore he was able to shove a board at out on the ice which they got hold of and were safely pulled to dry land.

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115 Years Ago – 1917

A light fall of snow covering the ground to the depth of two inches began Sunday evening, continuing a good portion of the night.  Vehicles of all kinds are still in use, including pungs, autos, buggies and sleds.  The temperature fell over 30 degrees during Monday night.