The Samuel Peart House

In 1782 this lot was owned by Mrs. Abigail Leach.  Prior to the building of a house, later owners included Tyler Parsons, Nathaniel Hildreth, Horace Grosvenor and Delucena Bingham. 

In 1828, for $100, John Allen sold to the Tappan brothers, a piece of land on Town Hill by the highway.  In 1832 the lot had a house on it and was owned by Jonathan Allen, housewright, highly likely the builder of the house.  He sold the lot and house for $526 to Samuel Peart Jr., a Manchester mariner. 

The left-hand portion of the house has six over six windows and the right-hand side has two over two with different trim.  The sap-faced granite ochre colored stone, capping the wall, is characteristic of some Rockport quarries; it contains a high level of iron oxide. 

Samuel’s father, Samuel Peart, Sr., a mariner, shipped out on Salem Schooner, “Columbia” in December 1810.  He drowned in 1814 leaving his wife and eight young children. 

In May 1823, Samuel Jr. married Lydia, daughter of Jonathan May and Lydia Stanwood.  At some point, Samuel became a yeoman, or crop farmer.   

1849 was a terrible year for Samuel, age fifty; his mother and wife both died.  In 1850 Samuel was living with neighbors.  The Peart house may have been occupied by the Dr. John Colby family as well as by Mary Tannatt, a native of Scotland, and her children.  It seems that Samuel was suffering with a serious illness; in March 1854 he was adjudged insane and placed under the guardianship of butcher, Philip Wheeler.  When Samuel died this same year, the house was sold to Stephen Danforth Jr. for a high bid of $805.  Debts were owed to several people including a boarding charge while being treated at McLean Hospital. 

In 1863 the homestead was sold again for $500 to Gilman Andrews, carver, a native of Essex.  In 1861 Gilman enlisted in Company L of the Third Mass. Calvary Regiment. 

Per the 1870 census, the house was a two family: in one unit lived Gilman Andrews, cabinetmaker and in the second unit, Orin Andrews, cabinetmaker.  Mrs. Lucy Andrews sold the house to Michael Coughlin, from Ireland, for $825.  When Michael died the house was sold to son, John Coughlin.  Annie Sullivan became the next owner in 1927. 

David and Hayley Demeter are the proud owners of this notable house.  David grew up in Manchester-by-the-Sea; his family and business remain in town. 

You can read the complete house history by Robert Booth at the Trask House. 

The MHM House History and Marker program encourages everyone to appreciate the diversity of stories our architecture tells us about our shared history. Participants receive an extensive history of their house and occupants, a certificate, and a handsome house marker.  A commissioned house history is a fabulous holiday gift.  For more information, go to www.manchesterhistoricalmuseum.org