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Her poems are right there, concerning themselves with items that are at hand, commonplace and familiar. The natural w…

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Long time writer and author Anna Kasabian recently completed the Trustees of Reservations book Castle Hill on the Crane Estate.  The book captures the essence of Chicago industrialist Richard Teller Crane Jr.’s summer home’s history and serves as well as a visitor's guide.

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Whenever a book of poems comes into the shop, I read a poem from it before I put it on the shelves. So, I've read hundreds of poems from hundreds of books over the last 22 years.  And yet, I invariably will read the shortest poem in the book!

I love books that break my heart. I can’t help it. I love a good cry in the safe space of a fictional character’s life. I also love fiction that helps me understand real-life situations better than real life can, or than my real life has the opportunity to. And if it’s beautifully written to boot? Swoon. Infinite Country, a new novel by Patricia Engel, joins a rarified list that accomplishes all of the above. 

In celebration of Women’s History Month, local author Pauline Renehan Weger and co-author Alicia Williamson, are releasing their new book Bravely.  Pauline, who came to Manchester in the fourth grade and lived in town for 15 years, has teamed up with Hannah Harlow at The Bookshop of Beverly Farms, to celebrate both the book launch and women in history.

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This winter hasn’t felt as hard as I thought it would. Here it is mid-February and I’m longing for more snow, for more chances at winter sports and quiet evenings under a warm blanket with a good book. Perhaps because we’ve been forced into a kind of hibernation for the past year, we’re already used to hiding away indoors when the weather turns bitterly cold. Is a snow day really that different than any other day right now? 

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When you are walking down to the beach on a sun-dappled gently breezy summer afternoon, you don't want Dostoevsky leaping onto your brain from behind a tree, dragging your soul out of your ear and into the bushes to give it a good kicking. Save that joy for the winter. During the cold bleak dark months the Russians novelists are the perfect guerillas I want creeping into my orbit to shove me into pondering the great Russian profundities and essences. 

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With the New Year comes resolutions, and with resolutions come a host of new books that pledge to help you with those resolutions.  I’m here to tell you to skip the dieting books.  Instead, do yourself a favor and read Group: How One Therapist and a Circle of Strangers Saved My Life, by Christie Tate.  

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As we prepare for our own blanket of snow to descend upon our landscape, I greatly enjoyed reading Snow by John Banville, a new mystery by a Booker Prize-winner author set in 1950s Ireland during a blizzard at Christmastime.  It’s set up as a classic country manor house mystery, opening with the murder of a Catholic priest in the library.  Detective Inspector St. John Strafford is called in from Dublin to investigate. 

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What is the Christmas Spirit?  The feeling of love and goodwill toward your fellow man - kindness, decency, mercy, forgiveness.  All those things and more.  Ideas and emotions that we don't dwell on too much during the year, but something about Christmastime brings these sentiments to the fore. How do you catch the Christmas Spirit?

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Arches to Zigzags:  An Architectural ABC has been published by Oro Editions. The book is the work of Manchester’s award-winning photographer Steve Rosenthal and his wife Kit along with Michael J. Crosbie. Paul Goldberger, the New York Times Book reviewer says in part, “The world does not nee…

The latest book by 92-year-old author and Manchester resident Katharine Stanley-Brown Abbott—her third—is A Zoo Full of Rhymes.  The small and tidy book is packed with 38 light and lyrical rhymes with animals, birds, sea creatures and insects ranging from a bluefish and bongo to auk and platypus.   

If you visit The Bookshop of Beverly Farms, which I highly recommend you do, there is something especially enchanting waiting on a little stack of shelves just before the register to your right. Here you will find a small collection of books wrapped in brown paper, and yes, tied up with string.

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As a book lover, I’m a sucker for books about books.  Novels like The Bookshop by Penelope Fitzgerald, Possession by A.S. Byatt, The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George, anything by Haruki Murakami.  Plus nonfiction like The Library Book by Susan Orlean, When Books Went to War, Reading Loli…

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Kris McGinn introduces us to a new feature in the Cricket, a book review feature.  Mark Stolle, owner of Manchester by the Book on Central Street will be a regular, and his column—not surprisingly called, "By The Book"—kicks us off with a recommendation that is an oldie but such a goodie, from an author Stolle calls "a master storyteller."

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The quiet comfort and familiarity of coastal Manchester’s tree-lined historic downtown with its small antique shops, used bookstore, and restaurants has made it the perfect backdrop for many a blockbuster film.  When Hollywood wants New England, it comes to Manchester-by-the-Sea.  So, here are some of Manchester’s greatest hits, and what they’re all about.

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The Book Club at First Parish is open to anyone and everyone.  They are currently meeting on the last Monday of each month on Zoom. The book for the July discussion is I Feel Bad About My Neck, by Nora Ephron.

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It was a totally packed house last Thursday at “Wigwams At Saw Mill Brook,” the first lecture in Manchester Historical Museum’s year-long series tied to Manchester’s 375th Anniversary.  Mary Ellen Lepionka, a historian and anthropologist and an expert on early inhabitants of Cape Ann, took rapt attendees through the amazing true story of Native Americans here.